Archive for electrical

Fears Confirmed that Isaac Stirred Up Macondo Oil

Posted in Gas Industry, Oil Drilling with tags , , , on September 7, 2012 by amandarandjtech
by  Jon Mainwaring
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Rigzone Staff

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Thursday, September 06, 2012

Original article found here

Fears Confirmed that Isaac Stirred Up Macondo Oil

Fears that Hurricane Isaac might have stirred up crude oil left over in the Gulf of Mexico after the Deepwater Horizon accident more than two years ago have been confirmed by BP after officials closed a 13-mile stretch of beach Tuesday due to tar balls and oil being reported.

According to the Associated Press, a BP spokesman said late Wednesday that the company was working with the Coast Guard, state officials and land managers to clean up oil on the Fourchon beach on the Louisiana coast and that clean-up crews would be there Thursday.

On Tuesday the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Secretary announced the emergency closure of a portion of coastal waters due the emergence of a large tar mat and concentrations of tar balls on beaches in the area. The LDWF banned all commercial fishing in these waters.

BP still has hundreds of workers operating on the Gulf Coast cleaning up oil that was leaked into the GOM from the Macondo prospect, where Deepwater Horizon was drilling.

The BP spokesman added that the storm had served a good purpose since it had made visible where the company can clean up.

Last week the Huffington Post reported that Garret Graves, chairman of Louisiana’s Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority, had warned up to one million barrels of oil is estimated to remain in the GOM because BP had failed to clean it all up.

In a statement sent to Rigzone on Thursday at noon (UK time) BP said:

“As anticipated prior to Hurricane Isaac making landfall, there are reports of residual Macondo oil along the shorelines near Fouchon Beach and Grand Isle. These are areas that were in active response prior to Isaac, so it was expected by the Gulf Coast Incident Management Team – which includes the United States Coast Guard, state representatives, other federal representatives, and BP – that these could be areas where highly weathered residual oil might be exposed.

“In accordance with the GCIMT’s Severe Weather Contingency Plan, with the arrival of Hurricane Isaac operations were suspended across the response area.  As areas are opened by the FOSC and appropriate safety assessments have been completed, we are redeploying crews to these areas to resume response operations.

“Under the direction of the Coast Guard and in accordance with the Gulf Coast Incident Management Team sampling protocols, we also anticipate testing this material to determine its origin.

“It is important to note, however, that there have been 90 reports of oil releases from other sources since the storm, and it is imperative that the parties responsible for that oil act in the same manner as BP and respond quickly in following Coast Guard directions.”

Fears Confirmed that Isaac Stirred Up Macondo Oil

A former engineer, Jon is an award-winning editor who has covered the technology, engineering and energy sectors since the mid-1990s. Email Jon at jmainwaring@rigzone.com.

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Mr. President, Now That We Need It, Give Us Our Oil Back

Posted in Gas Industry, Oil Drilling with tags , , , , , on April 13, 2012 by amandarandjtech

Raymond J. Learsy

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Columnist

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Friday, April 13, 2012

  • Iran is cheering
  • Speculators are profiting
  • Oil producers celebrating
  • Our nascent economy tottering
  • Household budgets being ripped apart
  • Home owners in Maine freezing

You are sitting on some 700 million barrels of oil in our Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) bought and paid by both the 99% and even the 1%.

Here we are living an economic and political emergency while the tool we have to deal with this issue remains untapped.

A reasonable release from the SPR would immediately drop the price of oil significantly and in turn keep gasoline prices from rising further in the months ahead and very possibly keep the economic recovery on track. In June 2011, when the Department of Energy announced it would be releasing 30 million barrels of oil, the price of oil dropped almost immediately by $4.00/barrel (“White House to release 30M barrels of oil” Politico 06.23.11) sending the speculators running for the hills.

Back then when the release was announced Speaker of the House John Boehner bridled:

Everyone wants to help the American people and lower prices at the pump — especially now, in tough economic times. And it is good that the Obama Administration is conceding that increased supply will lower those costs. But by tapping the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, the President is using a national security instrument to address his domestic political problems. The SPR was created to mitigate sudden supply disruptions. This action threatens our ability to respond to a genuine national security crisis and means we must ultimately find the resources to replenish the reserve — at significant cost to taxpayers.

This time around Mr. Boehner and everyone else should understand high, ever higher, oil prices are Iran’s most effective weapon. It will help the mullahs realize the cash flow they need to maintain their authoritarian rule while playing nuclear roulette. Embargoing swaths of their oil exports will have little or no impact if their saber rattling, together with the help of the oil speculators, pushes oil prices to ever higher highs.

Mr. President, pull the plug on the SPR now, and let the oil flow.

Raymond J. Learsy is the author of Oil and Finance: The Epic Corruption Continues and Over a Barrel: Breaking Oil’s Grip on Our Future. He has worked as a commodities trader, private investor and is currently a member of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. Learn more at www.raymondlearsy.com.

Original article found here

What equipment makes up a rig?

Posted in Gas Industry, Oil Drilling with tags , , , , , , on March 30, 2012 by amandarandjtech

Rig Equipment

Drilling rigs typically include at least some of the following items: See Drilling rig (petroleum) for a more detailed description.

  • Blowout preventers: (BOPs)

The equipment associated with a rig is to some extent dependent on the type of rig but (#23 & #24) are devices installed at the wellhead to prevent fluids and gases from unintentionally escaping from the borehole. #23 is the annular (often referred to as the “Hydril”, which is one manufacturer) and #24 is the pipe rams and blind rams. In the place of #24 Variable bore rams or VBR’s can be used, they offer the same pressure and sealing capacity found in standard pipe rams, while offering the versatility of sealing on various sizes of drill pipe, production tubing and casing without changing standard pipe rams. Normally VBR’s are used when utilizing a tapered drill string (when different size drill pipe is used in the complete drill string).

  • Centrifuge: an industrial version of the device that separates fine silt and sand from the drilling fluid.
  • Solids control: solids control equipments for preparing drilling mud for the drilling rig.
  • Chain tongs: wrench with a section of chain, that wraps around whatever is being tightened or loosened. Similar to a pipe wrench.
  • Degasser: a device that separates air and/or gas from the drilling fluid.
  • Desander / desilter: contains a set of hydrocyclones that separate sand and silt from the drilling fluid.
  • Drawworks: (#7) is the mechanical section that contains the spool, whose main function is to reel in/out the drill line to raise/lower the traveling block (#11).
  • Drill bit: (#26) device attached to the end of the drill string that breaks apart the rock being drilled. It contains jets through which the drilling fluid exits.
  • Drill pipe: (#16) joints of hollow tubing used to connect the surface equipment to the bottom hole assembly (BHA) and acts as a conduit for the drilling fluid. In the diagram, these are “stands” of drill pipe which are 2 or 3 joints of drill pipe connected together and “stood” in the derrick vertically, usually to save time while tripping pipe.
  • Elevators: a gripping device that is used to latch to the drill pipe or casing to facilitate the lowering or lifting (of pipe or casing) into or out of the borehole.
  • Mud motor: a hydraulically powered device positioned just above the drill bit used to spin the bit independently from the rest of the drill string.
  • Mud pump: (#4) reciprocal type of pump used to circulate drilling fluid through the system.
  • Mud tanks: (#1) often called mud pits, provides a reserve store of drilling fluid until it is required down the wellbore.
  • Rotary table: (#20) rotates the drill string along with the attached tools and bit.
  • Shale shaker: (#2) separates drill cuttings from the drilling fluid before it is pumped back down the borehole.
  • File:Oil Rig NT8.jpg

Limits of Technology in Drilling

Posted in Gas Industry, Oil Drilling with tags , , , , on March 23, 2012 by amandarandjtech

Drill technology has advanced steadily since the 19th century. However, there are several basic limiting factors which will determine the depth to which a bore hole can be sunk.

All holes must maintain outer diameter; the diameter of the hole must remain wider than the diameter of the rods or the rods cannot turn in the hole and progress cannot continue. Friction caused by the drilling operation will tend to reduce the outside diameter of the drill bit. This applies to all drilling methods, except that in diamond core drilling the use of thinner rods and casing may permit the hole to continue. Casing is simply a hollow sheath which protects the hole against collapse during drilling, and is made of metal or PVC. Often diamond holes will start off at a large diameter and when outside diameter is lost, thinner rods put down inside casing to continue, until finally the hole becomes too narrow. Alternatively, the hole can be reamed; this is the usual practice in oil well drilling where the hole size is maintained down to the next casing point.

For percussion techniques, the main limitation is air pressure. Air must be delivered to the piston at sufficient pressure to activate the reciprocating action, and in turn drive the head into the rock with sufficient strength to fracture and pulverise it. With depth, volume is added to the in-rod string, requiring larger compressors to achieve operational pressures. Secondly, groundwater is ubiquitous, and increases in pressure with depth in the ground. The air inside the rod string must be pressurised enough to overcome this water pressure at the bit face. Then, the air must be able to carry the rock fragments to surface. This is why depths in excess of 500 m for reverse circulation drilling are rarely achieved, because the cost is prohibitive and approaches the threshold at which diamond core drilling is more economic.

Diamond drilling can routinely achieve depths in excess of 1200 m. In cases where money is no issue, extreme depths have been achieved, because there is no requirement to overcome water pressure. However, circulation must be maintained to return the drill cuttings to surface, and more importantly to maintain cooling and lubrication of the cutting surface.

Without sufficient lubrication and cooling, the matrix of the drill bit will soften. While diamond is the hardest substance known, at 10 on the Mohs hardness scale, it must remain firmly in the matrix to achieve cutting. Weight on bit, the force exerted on the cutting face of the bit by the drill rods in the hole above the bit, must also be monitored.

File:@hand rig.jpg

www.powerprosusa.com

A career with R & J Technical

Posted in Electricians, Gas Industry, Oil Drilling, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , on February 3, 2012 by amandarandjtech

R & J is always looking for qualified and experienced industrial electricians for our North Dakota area.  We offer top pay and an excellent benefits package complete with per diem, travel, and housing.  Once our probation period of 90 days is complete, employees are eligible for our full time benefits.  The benefits we offer are health insurance, dental insurance, vision insurance, flex spending, 401K, profit sharing, and life insurance.  We also have a safety bonus program in effect that, if qualified, could earn our technicians another $500.00 per quarter.  Another benefit that R & J just instated is a “loyalty bonus”, which gives every north Dakota rig electrician $2.00 addition an hour for every hour worked, to be paid at the 1 year employment anniversary date, and thereafter every six months.  We also have a tool purchase program and a uniform allowance.  (Please inquire for more details on these).  R & J takes pride in our employees and likes to see them progress.  We will pay for electrical licensing, and when approved, training.  This is a great organization to work for, if you’d like more information about our company, please feel free to check out our website at www.powerprosusa.com

 

Parker Drilling Wraps up Alaska Drilling Rigs

Posted in Oil Drilling, R&J Technical Services with tags , , , , , , , , on January 19, 2012 by amandarandjtech
Parker Drilling Wraps Up Alaska Drilling Rigs
by  Parker Drilling
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Press Release

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Tuesday, January 17, 2012

Parker Drilling announced that completion of its two new-design Arctic Alaska Drilling Units (AADUs) has been delayed to allow the Company to modify the rigs to meet their design and functional requirements. The need for the modifications was determined as a result of comprehensive safety, technical and operational reviews during recent commissioning activities of these prototype drilling rigs. The modification work will extend the commissioning activities and increase the rigs’ total costs.

As a result of the extended construction and commissioning schedule and related increased costs, the two rigs’ cost at completion is currently estimated to be $385 million, which includes capitalized interest of approximately $49 million. This cost exceeds the estimated fair value of the rigs based on their projected cash flows. In order to adjust the rigs’ values to their estimated fair value, the Company expects to record a pre-tax, non-cash charge in the 2011 fourth quarter of approximately $171 million. This is expected to reduce 2011 fourth quarter after-tax earnings per share by approximately $0.95.

The AADUs represent a new class of drilling rig that incorporates some of the most advanced features available in the global land rig market, including a safety-engineered, state-of-the-art equipment package; a highly automated drilling system; zero-discharge capabilities; and a modular design allowing the entire rig to transport itself in three, fully-enclosed mobile units.

“Our intent is to deliver to our customer and to Alaska’s North Slope drilling market a more productive drilling rig than what is currently available. We expect the AADUs to establish a new standard of performance for arctic drilling programs,” said Parker Drilling President and Chief Executive Officer, David Mannon.

“The unique design for these new, technologically-advanced rigs posed engineering, construction and commissioning challenges that have resulted in unanticipated design modifications, delays and cost increases. The actions we are taking are important to meeting the operational and safety objectives we desire. We continue to work diligently toward completion of this project,” said Mannon.

A message to R & J employees from the President of the company

Posted in Oil Drilling, R&J Technical Services with tags , , , , , , , , on January 13, 2012 by amandarandjtech

            As we enter another year, I would like to say how much I appreciate everyone’s hard work.  We continually get a little better each year, and I appreciate the progress.  We are continually being challenged with different issues, but as a team, we are effectively addressing those issues.  We have very unique challenges due to the nature of the work, and the location we work in.  As we grow and change, I appreciate the people that stay with us and accept the challenges.  As a company, we make every endeavor to make it your jobs as rewarding as possible without jeopardizing our long-term goals.  We strive for everyone to be able to retire from R & J, not as just a temporary stopping point, and it takes commitment from top to bottom. 

~Ron Houskeeper