Archive for the Uncategorized Category

Bakken Oil Show

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , on September 21, 2012 by amandarandjtech

It’s that time of year again fort he Bakken Oil Show!  R & J will be there, with a chance for you to meet some of the founders and decision makers of the company.  The show is in Williston North Dakota, at the Raymond Family Community Center, located at 1002 11th St. West, Williston, ND 58801.  The dates of the show are October 10th and 11th.   If you’ll be in the area, stop by and see us and make sure to enter to win our prize!  Last year we raffled off a rifle.  To learn more about the show, please visit their website

 

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Romney Plan ‘Could Be Positive’ for Oil Services, Drilling Cos

Posted in Uncategorized on August 27, 2012 by amandarandjtech
Originaly article found here
 
by  Karen Boman
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Rigzone Staff

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Friday, August 24, 2012

 
 

 
Romney Plan 'Could Be Positive' for Oil Services, Drilling Cos

Republican Presidential nominee Mitt Romney’s proposed energy plan could be positive for the oil services and drilling industry, with its goals of streamlining and improving the permitting process, opening up new areas for drilling and boosting overall drilling activity, according to a recent research note from Barclays Capital.

Seismic companies and eventually offshore drillers could benefit from Romney’s plan to open acreage offshore Virginia and the Carolinas for exploration, Barclays analyst James C. West said in the Aug. 24 research note.

Barclays views as favorable Romney’s plan for approving permits for seismic surveys to “immediately update decades-old information”, as well Romney’s call for collaboration with Canada and Mexico on geological data and requiring onshore domestic geological and geophysical data to be shared with the Interior Department.

“We view recently enacted and forthcoming regulations as supportive for stimulating offshore activity in light of the heightened safety conscious post-Macondo world, and see little scope for these to be overtuned regardless of the election outcome,” said West, referencing an Aug. 21 research note.

In the Aug. 21 note, Barclays analysts said they expected high-spec equipment makers and drillers to benefit from recent regulatory developments, such as the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE) issuing its final drilling safety rule.

The final drilling largely cleans up the interim rule through minor edits, with minimal additions or material changes, noted West. The rule also removes language stating operators “must” adhere to certain American Petroleum Institute (API) suggestions, providing greater flexibility for interpretation and limiting adverse unintended operational consequences.

“We think this update will lead to operational improvements in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico and less back and forth between regulators and operators,” West said.

Barclays believes industry will keep moving forward with the implementation of its own set of best practices and standards for blowout preventers, even if BSEE misses the cut-off date for issuing a proposed rule this year.

Romney’s plan to empower states to oversee energy production on federal lands – and including language for all-around increased state control – could elevate the fracking debate in the general election and, if Romney won the presidential election, would help quell questions surrounding hydraulic fracturing being regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, West said.

Two energy industry groups, the American Petroleum Institute (API) and the Western Gas Alliance (WEA) on Thursday applauded the plan.

API President and CEO Jack Gerard on Thursday said proposals such as Romney’s that promote the safe production of more domestic energy are critical to the nation’s economic future, providing economic stimulus and job creation.

“The proposals released [Thursday] by the governor will assist in encouraging that public conservation on how more North American made energy can be an economic game changer,” Gerard said in a statement.

Gerard pointed to results from a recent API poll that showed more than 70 percent of U.S. voters favor increased access to U.S. oil and gas resources, believing it will lead to more U.S. jobs and lower energy costs.

Denver-based WEA applauded the plan, saying that Gov. Romney’s plan “recognizes that empowering states, rather than imposing a one-size-fits-all government approach, is the right way to increase American energy, create jobs, and grow the economy” said Kathleen Sgamma, vice president of government & public affairs for WEA.

“By empowering states and modernizing bureaucratic processes, our nation can unlock energy resources on non-park, non-wilderness federal lands while achieving a better balance between economic growth and environmental protection,” said Sgamma.

T. Boone Pickens told CBSNews on Thursday that he was disappointed that Romney didn’t mention natural gas, noting that the United States has more natural gas than any other country in the world.

While Romney’s proposed energy plan mimics efforts in Congress, the fact that Romney has tried to set tangible goals by specific dates sets it apart from other initiatives. However, it may very well be more talk than anything else, a trend also seen in Congress, said Andrew Schrage, co-owner of the financial website Money Crashers.

Schrage notes that Romney’s promises of adding 3 million jobs, significantly reducing the unemployment rate and increasing the U.S. economy by approximately $500 billion, are long-term goals at best.

Romney’s claim that opening government lands for drilling would result in trillions of dollars in revenue contradicts a recent report from the Congressional Budget Office that the revenues created by more access to federal lands would be closer to $7 billion.

Romney’s plan to reduce government regulation should be easy to implement.

“In a nut shell, I think the general basics behind Romney’s politics can be implemented,” Schrage commented. “I’m just not quite sure they’ll yield the lofty goals he’s currently touting.”

The proposed plan can only succeed when combined with some serious energy conservation on the part of Americans, something Romney has not yet discussed.

“And of course, his chance of success in implementing his energy policy also highly depends on who controls the House of Representatives and the Senate,” Schrage noted.

Karen Boman has more than 10 years of experience covering the upstream oil and gas sector. Email Karen at kboman@rigzone.com.

First Ladies of O&G

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , on July 13, 2012 by amandarandjtech
First Ladies of O&G: Frontline Females Retrace Steps Forward
by  Robin Dupre
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Rigzone Staff

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Thursday, July 12, 2012

First Ladies of O&G: Frontline Females Retrace Steps Forward

In the southern part of the United States, past the bayous and swamp lands, lies an offshore world that was once only too familiar to men. An offshore oil rig is home, for a short period of time, to many men and women working in the energy industry.

These cramped quarters, where men and women live together for weeks at a time forces them to mesh, complement and live as one. But what many newcomers fully don’t comprehend is what it took – mistakes, experiences and life changing events – for the gender differences to become obsolete in the eyes of the roustabouts and roughnecks manning the drill.

“I have no clue what it is like for women in the oil field today,” stated Martha Scott, a retired oil rig worker. “For me, one of the female pioneers in the oil field, I believe it could be summed up as respect and forgiveness. It was new for all of us… and there needed to be a respect to the new ground that we were treading, as well as forgiveness for transgressions that might occur while learning the way of this new path.”

In 1964, the federal government passed the Civil Rights Act  prohibiting employment discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex and national origin. A year before, the Equal Pay Act of 1963 was entered, protecting men and women who perform substantially equal work in the same establishment from sex-based wage discrimination.

These two laws helped pave the way for Martha Scott and Valerie Hensley, two best friends that met on an oil rig in a male-dominated industry with the same goal in mind – to make a good living working hard in the oil and gas industry, just like everybody else.

Crude Oil Settles up on Hope of Fed Stimulus

Posted in Uncategorized on June 15, 2012 by amandarandjtech
by  Dow Jones Newswires
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David Bird

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Thursday, June 14, 2012

Original article found here

Crude oil futures prices rose 1.6% Thursday, settling near $84 a barrel, amid fresh hopes of a new move by the Federal Reserve to stimulate the U.S. economy.

Oil prices recovered from eight-month lows and day earlier, moving higher in line with equities, after the Labor Department said the U.S. consumer price index fell in May for the first time in two years and that new jobless claims rose for fifth of last six weeks.

Phil Flynn, oil analyst at Price Futures Group, said, taken together, the latest data “seems to be begging for more” economic stimulus moves by the Fed, which he said, would pump up oil prices.

Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke said last week the central bank was “prepared to take action” if the economy deteriorates, given the “subdued” inflation outlook. But he said the Fed was still assessing the situation ahead of next week’s policy meeting.

Light, sweet crude oil for July delivery on the New York Mercantile Exchange settled 1.6%, or $1.29 a barrel, higher at $83.91 a barrel, the highest level since Friday.

ICE July Brent crude oil expired down 10 cents at the settlement, at $97.03 a barrel, was 2 cents lower at $97.11 a barrel. That drop marked the fourth straight day that front-month Brent prices settled at the lowest level since January 2011. August Brent settled up 45 cents, at $97.17 a barrel.

Global benchmark crude oil prices were mixed and swinging on either side of unchanged for much of the morning, awaiting developments from the oil output policy meeting of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries.

OPEC formally announced in late trading it was keeping its leaky output ceiling of 30 million barrels a day in place, and said members had made commitments to cut some 1.6 million barrels a day of output to reach that level.

But traders were skeptical that Saudi Arabia, the world’s biggest oil exporter, would cut output significantly or swiftly, given the fragile state of the global economy. Saudi Arabia, in recent months, boosted its output sharply to 10 million barrels a day to cover a potential shortfall of Iranian crude due to stricter sanctions and to bring down soaring prices that threatened the global economy.

Saudi Arabia Oil Minister Ali Naimi said ahead of the talks that his country was meeting customer demand for oil and would continue to do so.

The output cap “doesn’t necessarily have any bearing on the question of actual production,” said Tim Evans, analyst at Citi Futures Perspective. “Whatever language they use in their statement, we’ll have to wait for actual data to see how they perform.”

Gene McGillian, a broker and analyst at Tradition Energy, said he expects U.S. crude oil prices to hold between $80 and $85 in the near term. “The market is catching its breath after the eight-month lows, but I’m not seeing strong enough signals to see a market bottom,” he said. Mr. McGillian said the Greek election results this weekend could determine whether the struggling nation exits the euro and set the course for European and global economies, and thus demand for oil.

Reformulated-gasoline-blendstock futures for July settled 2.10 cents higher at $2.6764 a gallon. July heating oil settled up 1.69 cents, at $2.6278 a gallon.

 

Copyright (c) 2012 Dow Jones & Company, Inc.

Drilling Types

Posted in Gas Industry, Oil Drilling, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , on March 16, 2012 by amandarandjtech

There are a variety of drill mechanisms which can be used to sink a borehole into the ground. Each has its advantages and disadvantages, in terms of the depth to which it can drill, the type of sample returned, the costs involved and penetration rates achieved. There are two basic types of drills: drills which produce rock chips, and drills which produce core samples.

Auger drilling

Auger drilling is done with a helical screw which is driven into the ground with rotation; the earth is lifted up the borehole by the blade of the screw. Hollow stem auger drilling is used for softer ground such as swamps where the hole will not stay open by itself for environmental drilling, geotechnical drilling, soil engineering and geochemistry reconnaissance work in exploration for mineral deposits. Solid flight augers/bucket augers are used in harder ground construction drilling. In some cases, mine shafts are dug with auger drills. Small augers can be mounted on the back of a utility truck, with large augers used for sinking piles for bridge foundations.

Auger drilling is restricted to generally soft unconsolidated material or weak weathered rock. It is cheap and fast.

Cable tool water well drilling rig in Kimball, West Virginia. These slow rigs have mostly been replaced by rotary drilling rigs in the U.S.

Percussion rotary air blast drilling (RAB)

RAB drilling is used most frequently in the mineral exploration industry. (This tool is also known as a Down-the-hole drill.) The drill uses a pneumatic reciprocating piston-driven “hammer” to energetically drive a heavy drill bit into the rock. The drill bit is hollow, solid steel and has ~20 mm thick tungsten rods protruding from the steel matrix as “buttons”. The tungsten buttons are the cutting face of the bit.

The cuttings are blown up the outside of the rods and collected at surface. Air or a combination of air and foam lift the cuttings.

RAB drilling is used primarily for mineral exploration, water bore drilling and blast-hole drilling in mines, as well as for other applications such as engineering, etc. RAB produces lower quality samples because the cuttings are blown up the outside of the rods and can be contaminated from contact with other rocks. RAB drilling at extreme depth, if it encounters water, may rapidly clog the outside of the hole with debris, precluding removal of drill cuttings from the hole. This can be counteracted, however, with the use of “stabilisers” also known as “reamers”, which are large cylindrical pieces of steel attached to the drill string, and made to perfectly fit the size of the hole being drilled. These have sets of rollers on the side, usually with tungsten buttons, that constantly break down cuttings being pushed upwards.

The use of high-powered air compressors, which push 900-1150 cfm of air at 300-350 psi down the hole also ensures drilling of a deeper hole up to ~1250 m due to higher air pressure which pushes all rock cuttings and any water to the surface. This, of course, is all dependent on the density and weight of the rock being drilled, and on how worn the drill bit is.

Air core drilling

Air core drilling and related methods use hardened steel or tungsten blades to bore a hole into unconsolidated ground. The drill bit has three blades arranged around the bit head, which cut the unconsolidated ground. The rods are hollow and contain an inner tube which sits inside the hollow outer rod barrel. The drill cuttings are removed by injection of compressed air into the hole via the annular area between the innertube and the drill rod. The cuttings are then blown back to surface up the inner tube where they pass through the sample separating system and are collected if needed. Drilling continues with the addition of rods to the top of the drill string. Air core drilling can occasionally produce small chunks of cored rock.

This method of drilling is used to drill the weathered regolith, as the drill rig and steel or tungsten blades cannot penetrate fresh rock. Where possible, air core drilling is preferred over RAB drilling as it provides a more representative sample. Air core drilling can achieve depths approaching 300 meters in good conditions. As the cuttings are removed inside the rods and are less prone to contamination compared to conventional drilling where the cuttings pass to the surface via outside return between the outside of the drill rod and the walls of the hole. This method is more costly and slower than RAB.

Cable tool drilling

SpeedStar cable tool drilling rig, Ballston Spa, New York

Cable tool rigs are a traditional way of drilling water wells. The majority of large diameter water supply wells, especially deep wells completed in bedrock aquifers, were completed using this drilling method. Although this drilling method has largely been supplanted in recent years by other, faster drilling techniques, it is still the most practicable drilling method for large diameter, deep bedrock wells, and in widespread use for small rural water supply wells. The impact of the drill bit fractures the rock and in many shale rock situations increases the water flow into a well over rotary.

Also known as ballistic well drilling and sometimes called “spudders”, these rigs raise and drop a drill string with a heavy carbide tipped drilling bit that chisels through the rock by finely pulverizing the subsurface materials. The drill string is composed of the upper drill rods, a set of “jars” (inter-locking “sliders” that help transmit additional energy to the drill bit and assist in removing the bit if it is stuck) and the drill bit. During the drilling process, the drill string is periodically removed from the borehole and a bailer is lowered to collect the drill cuttings (rock fragments, soil, etc.). The bailer is a bucket-like tool with a trapdoor in the base. If the borehole is dry, water is added so that the drill cuttings will flow into the bailer. When lifted, the trapdoor closes and the cuttings are then raised and removed. Since the drill string must be raised and lowered to advance the boring, the casing (larger diameter outer piping) is typically used to hold back upper soil materials and stabilize the borehole.

Cable tool rigs are simpler and cheaper than similarly sized rotary rigs, although loud and very slow to operate. The world record cable tool well was drilled in New York to a depth of almost 12,000 feet (3,700 m). The common Bucyrus Erie 22 can drill down to about 1,100 feet (340 m). Since cable tool drilling does not use air to eject the drilling chips like a rotary, instead using a cable strung bailer, technically there is no limitation on depth.

Cable tool rigs now are nearly obsolete in the United States. They are mostly used in Africa or Third-World countries. Being slow, cable tool rig drilling means increased wages for drillers. In the United States drilling wages would average around US$200 per day per man, while in Africa it is only US$6 per day per man, so a slow drilling machine can still be used in undeveloped countries with depressed wages. A cable tool rig can drill 25 feet (7.6 m) to 60 feet (18 m) of hard rock a day. A newer rotary drillcat top head rig equipped with down-the-hole (DTH) hammer can drill 500 feet (150 m) or more per day, depending on size and formation hardness.

Reverse circulation (RC) drilling

Reverse Circulation (RC) rig, outside Newman, Western Australia

Track mounted Reverse Circulation rig (side view).

RC drilling is similar to air core drilling, in that the drill cuttings are returned to surface inside the rods. The drilling mechanism is a pneumatic reciprocating piston known as a “hammer” driving a tungsten-steel drill bit. RC drilling utilises much larger rigs and machinery and depths of up to 500 metres are routinely achieved. RC drilling ideally produces dry rock chips, as large air compressors dry the rock out ahead of the advancing drill bit. RC drilling is slower and costlier but achieves better penetration than RAB or air core drilling; it is cheaper than diamond coring and is thus preferred for most mineral exploration work.

Reverse circulation is achieved by blowing air down the rods, the differential pressure creating air lift of the water and cuttings up the “inner tube”, which is inside each rod. It reaches the “bell” at the top of the hole, then moves through a sample hose which is attached to the top of the “cyclone”. The drill cuttings travel around the inside of the cyclone until they fall through an opening at the bottom and are collected in a sample bag.

The most commonly used RC drill bits are 5-8 inches (13–20 cm) in diameter and have round metal ‘buttons’ that protrude from the bit, which are required to drill through shale and abrasive rock. As the buttons wear down, drilling becomes slower and the rod string can potentially become bogged in the hole. This is a problem as trying to recover the rods may take hours and in some cases weeks. The rods and drill bits themselves are very expensive, often resulting in great cost to drilling companies when equipment is lost down the bore hole. Most companies will regularly re-grind the buttons on their drill bits in order to prevent this, and to speed up progress. Usually, when something is lost (breaks off) in the hole, it is not the drill string, but rather from the bit, hammer, or stabiliser to the bottom of the drill string (bit). This is usually caused by a blunt bit getting stuck in fresh rock, over-stressed metal, or a fresh drill bit getting stuck in a part of the hole that is too small, owing to having used a bit that has worn to smaller than the desired hole diameter.

Although RC drilling is air-powered, water is also used, to reduce dust, keep the drill bit cool, and assist in pushing cutting back upwards, but also when “collaring” a new hole. A mud called “Liqui-Pol” is mixed with water and pumped into the rod string, down the hole. This helps to bring up the sample to the surface by making the sand stick together. Occasionally, “Super-Foam” (a.k.a. “Quik-Foam”) is also used, to bring all the very fine cuttings to the surface, and to clean the hole. When the drill reaches hard rock, a “collar” is put down the hole around the rods, which is normally PVC piping. Occasionally the collar may be made from metal casing. Collaring a hole is needed to stop the walls from caving in and bogging the rod string at the top of the hole. Collars may be up to 60 metres deep, depending on the ground, although if drilling through hard rock a collar may not be necessary.

Reverse circulation rig setups usually consist of a support vehicle, an auxiliary vehicle, as well as the rig itself. The support vehicle, normally a truck, holds diesel and water tanks for resupplying the rig. It also holds other supplies needed for maintenance on the rig. The auxiliary is a vehicle, carrying an auxiliary engine and a booster engine. These engines are connected to the rig by high pressure air hoses. Although RC rigs have their own booster and compressor to generate air pressure, extra power is needed which usually isn’t supplied by the rig due to lack of space for these large engines. Instead, the engines are mounted on the auxiliary vehicle. Compressors on an RC rig have an output of around 1000 cfm at 500 psi (500 L·s−1 at 3.4 MPa). Alternatively, stand-alone air compressors which have an output of 900-1150cfm at 300-350 psi each are used in sets of 2, 3, or 4, which are all routed to the rig through a multi-valve manifold.

Diamond core drilling

Multi-combination drilling rig (capable of both diamond and reverse circulation drilling). Rig is currently set up for diamond drilling.

Diamond core drilling (exploration diamond drilling) utilizes an annular diamond-impregnated drill bit attached to the end of hollow drill rods to cut a cylindrical core of solid rock. The diamonds used are fine to microfine industrial grade diamonds. They are set within a matrix of varying hardness, from brass to high-grade steel. Matrix hardness, diamond size and dosing can be varied according to the rock which must be cut. Holes within the bit allow water to be delivered to the cutting face. This provides three essential functions — lubrication, cooling, and removal of drill cuttings from the hole.

Diamond drilling is much slower than reverse circulation (RC) drilling due to the hardness of the ground being drilled. Drilling of 1200 to 1800 metres is common and at these depths, ground is mainly hard rock. Diamond rigs need to drill slowly to lengthen the life of drill bits and rods, which are very expensive.

Core samples are retrieved via the use of a core tube, a hollow tube placed inside the rod string and pumped with water until it locks into the core barrel. As the core is drilled, the core barrel slides over the core as it is cut. An “overshot” attached to the end of the winch cable is lowered inside the rod string and locks on to the backend(aka head assembly), located on the top end of the core barrel. The winch is retracted, pulling the core tube to the surface. The core does not drop out of the inside of the core tube when lifted because either a split ring core lifter or basket retainer allow the core to move into, but not back out of the tube.

 

Diamond core drill bits

Once the core tube is removed from the hole, the core sample is then removed from the core tube and catalogued. The Driller’s assistant unscrews the backend off the core tube using tube wrenches, then each part of the tube is taken and the core is shaken out into core trays. The core is washed, measured and broken into smaller pieces using a hammer or sawn through to make it fit into the sample trays. Once catalogued, the core trays are retrieved by geologists who then analyse the core and determine if the drill site is a good location to expand future mining operations.

Diamond rigs can also be part of a multi-combination rig. Multi-combination rigs are a dual setup rig capable of operating in either a reverse circulation (RC) and diamond drilling role (though not at the same time). This is a common scenario where exploration drilling is being performed in a very isolated location. The rig is first set up to drill as an RC rig and once the desired metres are drilled, the rig is set up for diamond drilling. This way the deeper metres of the hole can be drilled without moving the rig and waiting for a diamond rig to set up on the pad.

Direct push rigs

Direct push technology includes several types of drilling rigs and drilling equipment which advances a drill string by pushing or hammering without rotating the drill string. While this does not meet the proper definition of drilling, it does achieve the same result — a borehole. Direct push rigs include both cone penetration testing (CPT) rigs and direct push sampling rigs such as a PowerProbe or Geoprobe. Direct push rigs typically are limited to drilling in unconsolidated soil materials and very soft rock.

CPT rigs advance specialized testing equipment (such as electronic cones), and soil samplers using large hydraulic rams. Most CPT rigs are heavily ballasted (20 metric tons is typical) as a counter force against the pushing force of the hydraulic rams which are often rated up to 20 kN. Alternatively, small, light CPT rigs and offshore CPT rigs will use anchors such as screwed-in ground anchors to create the reactive force. In ideal conditions, CPT rigs can achieve production rates of up to 250–300 meters per day.

Direct push drilling rigs use hydraulic cylinders and a hydraulic hammer in advancing a hollow core sampler to gather soil and groundwater samples. The speed and depth of penetration is largely dependent on the soil type, the size of the sampler, and the weight and power the rig. Direct push techniques are generally limited to shallow soil sample recovery in unconsolidated soil materials. The advantage of direct push technology is that in the right soil type it can produce a large number of high quality samples quickly and cheaply, generally from 50 to 75 meters per day. Rather than hammering, direct push can also be combined with sonic (vibratory) methods to increase drill efficiency.

Hydraulic rotary drilling

Oil well drilling utilises tri-cone roller, carbide embedded, fixed-cutter diamond, or diamond-impregnated drill bits to wear away at the cutting face. This is preferred because there is no need to return intact samples to surface for assay as the objective is to reach a formation containing oil or natural gas. Sizable machinery is used, enabling depths of several kilometres to be penetrated. Rotating hollow drill pipes carry down bentonite and barite infused drilling muds to lubricate, cool, and clean the drilling bit, control downhole pressures, stabilize the wall of the borehole and remove drill cuttings. The mud travels back to the surface around the outside of the drill pipe, called the annulus. Examining rock chips extracted from the mud is known as mud logging. Another form of well logging is electronic and is frequently employed to evaluate the existence of possible oil and gas deposits in the borehole. This can take place while the well is being drilled, using Measurement While Drilling tools, or after drilling, by lowering measurement tools into the newly drilled hole.

The rotary system of drilling was in general use in Texas in the early 1900s. It is a modification of one invented by Fauvelle in 1845, and used in the early years of the oil industry in some of the oil-producing countries in Europe. Originally pressurized water was used instead of mud, and was almost useless in hard rock before the diamond cutting bit.[2] The main breakthrough for rotary drilling came in 1901, when Anthony Francis Lucas combined the use of a steam-driven rig and of mud instead of water in the Spindletop discovery well.

The drilling and production of oil and gas can pose a safety risk and a hazard to the environment from the ignition of the entrained gas causing dangerous fires and also from the risk of oil leakage polluting water, land and groundwater. For these reasons, redundant safety systems and highly trained personnel are required by law in all countries with significant production.

Sonic (vibratory) drilling

A sonic drill head works by sending high frequency resonant vibrations down the drill string to the drill bit, while the operator controls these frequencies to suit the specific conditions of the soil/rock geology. Vibrations may also be generated within the drill head. The frequency is generally between 50 and 120 hertz (cycles per second) and can be varied by the operator.

Resonance magnifies the amplitude of the drill bit, which fluidizes the soil particles at the bit face, allowing for fast and easy penetration through most geological formations. An internal spring system isolates these vibrational forces from the rest of the drill rig.

 

www.powerprosusa.com

Mobile Drilling Rigs

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , on March 2, 2012 by amandarandjtech

In early oil exploration, drilling rigs were semi-permanent in nature and the derricks were often built on site and left in place after the completion of the well. In more recent times drilling rigs are expensive custom-built machines that can be moved from well to well. Some light duty drilling rigs are like a mobile crane and are more usually used to drill water wells. Larger land rigs must be broken apart into sections and loads to move to a new place, a process which can often take weeks.

Small mobile drilling rigs are also used to drill or bore piles. Rigs can range from 100 ton continuous flight auger (CFA) rigs to small air powered rigs used to drill holes in quarries, etc. These rigs use the same technology and equipment as the oil drilling rigs, just on a smaller scale.

The drilling mechanisms outlined below differ mechanically in terms of the machinery used, but also in terms of the method by which drill cuttings are removed from the cutting face of the drill and returned to surface p .

A career with R & J Technical

Posted in Electricians, Gas Industry, Oil Drilling, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , on February 3, 2012 by amandarandjtech

R & J is always looking for qualified and experienced industrial electricians for our North Dakota area.  We offer top pay and an excellent benefits package complete with per diem, travel, and housing.  Once our probation period of 90 days is complete, employees are eligible for our full time benefits.  The benefits we offer are health insurance, dental insurance, vision insurance, flex spending, 401K, profit sharing, and life insurance.  We also have a safety bonus program in effect that, if qualified, could earn our technicians another $500.00 per quarter.  Another benefit that R & J just instated is a “loyalty bonus”, which gives every north Dakota rig electrician $2.00 addition an hour for every hour worked, to be paid at the 1 year employment anniversary date, and thereafter every six months.  We also have a tool purchase program and a uniform allowance.  (Please inquire for more details on these).  R & J takes pride in our employees and likes to see them progress.  We will pay for electrical licensing, and when approved, training.  This is a great organization to work for, if you’d like more information about our company, please feel free to check out our website at www.powerprosusa.com