Archive for February, 2012

History of the drilling rig

Posted in Gas Industry, Oil Drilling with tags , , on February 24, 2012 by amandarandjtech

Until internal combustion engines were developed in the late 19th century, the main method for drilling rock was muscle power of man or animal. Rods were turned by hand, using clamps attached to the rod. The rope and drop method invented in Zigong, China used a steel rod or piston raised and dropped vertically via a rope. Mechanised versions of this persisted until about 1970, using a cam to rapidly raise and drop what, by then, was a steel cable.

Swanson Drilling Texas East at night

In the 1970s, outside of the oil and gas industry, roller bits using mud circulation were replaced by the first pneumatic reciprocating piston Reverse Circulation (RC) drills, and became essentially obsolete for most shallow drilling, and are now only used in certain situations where rocks preclude other methods. RC drilling proved much faster and more efficient, and continues to improve with better metallurgy, deriving harder, more durable bits, and compressors delivering higher air pressures at higher volumes, enabling deeper and faster penetration. Diamond drilling has remained essentially unchanged since its inception.

Antique drilling rig now on display at Western History Museum in Lingle, Wyoming. It was used to drill many water wells in that area—many of those wells are still in use.

Antique drilling Rigs in Zigong, China

Advertisements

What is a Drilling Rig?

Posted in Gas Industry, Oil Drilling with tags , , , , on February 10, 2012 by amandarandjtech

We’d like to educate the general public on what an oil rig really is.  Over the next few posts, we’ll be going over the history, types, technology, and overal synopsis.

A drilling rig is a machine which creates holes (usually called boreholes) or shafts in the ground. Drilling rigs can be massive structures housing equipment used to drill water wells, oil wells, or natural gas extraction wells, or they can be small enough to be moved manually by one person. They sample sub-surface mineral deposits, test rock, soil and groundwater physical properties, and also can be used to install sub-surface fabrications, such as underground utilities, instrumentation, tunnels or wells. Drilling rigs can be mobile equipment mounted on trucks, tracks or trailers, or more permanent land or marine-based structures (such as oil platforms, commonly called ‘offshore oil rigs’ even if they don’t contain a drilling rig). The term “rig” therefore generally refers to the complex of equipment that is used to penetrate the surface of the Earth’s crust.

 

Swanson Drilling East Texas at dusk

Drilling rigs can be:

  • Small and portable, such as those used in mineral exploration drilling, water wells and environmental investigations.
  • Huge, capable of drilling through thousands of meters of the Earth’s crust. Large “mud pumps” circulate drilling mud (slurry) through the drill bit and up the casing annulus, for cooling and removing the “cuttings” while a well is drilled. Hoists in the rig can lift hundreds of tons of pipe. Other equipment can force acid or sand into reservoirs to facilitate extraction of the oil or natural gas; and in remote locations there can be permanent living accommodation and catering for crews (which may be more than a hundred). Marine rigs may operate many hundreds of miles or kilometres distant from the supply base with infrequent crew rotation or cycle.

A career with R & J Technical

Posted in Electricians, Gas Industry, Oil Drilling, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , on February 3, 2012 by amandarandjtech

R & J is always looking for qualified and experienced industrial electricians for our North Dakota area.  We offer top pay and an excellent benefits package complete with per diem, travel, and housing.  Once our probation period of 90 days is complete, employees are eligible for our full time benefits.  The benefits we offer are health insurance, dental insurance, vision insurance, flex spending, 401K, profit sharing, and life insurance.  We also have a safety bonus program in effect that, if qualified, could earn our technicians another $500.00 per quarter.  Another benefit that R & J just instated is a “loyalty bonus”, which gives every north Dakota rig electrician $2.00 addition an hour for every hour worked, to be paid at the 1 year employment anniversary date, and thereafter every six months.  We also have a tool purchase program and a uniform allowance.  (Please inquire for more details on these).  R & J takes pride in our employees and likes to see them progress.  We will pay for electrical licensing, and when approved, training.  This is a great organization to work for, if you’d like more information about our company, please feel free to check out our website at www.powerprosusa.com